Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights

In Brief

1968, Washington, NYC, Florence

Description

(1968, Washington/NYC/Florence; www.rfkcenter.org).

Grounded in RFK’s concern for the poor and the powerless, the struggle for justice, and remedies for disparities of opportunity. Eight programs: 1) Partners for Human Rights (forges multi-year partnerships with recipients of the annual Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award—now 45 laureates from 27 countries); 2) Truth to Power (uses experiences of “defenders” from around the world to educate students and urge them to action; issues include slavery, environmental activism, religious self-determination, political participation, etc); 3) Bullying (provides information and resources to create safe environments that prevent bullying and other negative behaviors); 4) Compass (engages financial institutions and business leaders in partnership with underprivileged local communities and government agencies to advance a discussion of connections among investment performance, fiduciary duty, and public interest issues, so as to optimize risk-adjusted rates of returns and address current and future global challenges); 5) Training Institute
(2014 curriculum included expert meetings and discussions on issues related to women rights, LGBT people, freedom of expression, human rights protection mechanisms, and internet security; 6) Health eVillages (provides mobile health technology and medical reference and clinical decision support resources to professionals in the most challenging clinical environments around the world); 7) Juvenile Justice (develops and implements innovative models for alternatives to juvenile incarceration, to bring the practice of direct service and the power of advocacy together to strengthen the rights of juveniles; also urges more effective policies for adjudicated youth transitioning back into their communities); 8) Young Leaders (empowering young human rights defenders, and motivating a diverse community of young people to take action for social justice and human rights).

Also makes a variety of awards to amplify the work of activists, authors, journalists, and students: recognizes individuals who stand up to oppression at grave personal risk in the nonviolent pursuit of human rights; honors the book that most forcefully reflects Robert Kennedy’s priorities (concern for the poor and the powerless, the struggle for even-handed justice, and remedies for disparities of power and opportunity); celebrates excellence in investigative journalism in the US and in Italy; lauds leaders of the international business, entertainment, and activist communities who demonstrate commitment to social change. Budget: ~$8M/yr; Staff: 41; President: Kerry Kennedy.

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